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UC Davis Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science

UC Davis Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science

 

Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science
Client: UC Davis
Location: Davis, California
Construction Cost: $61,000,000

The Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science provides facilities for the UC Davis departments of Viticulture and Enology and Food Science and Technology.  The Robert Mondavi Institute consists of a complex of five buildings. The academic buildings, comprised of three separate structures, encompass approximately 131,000 gross square feet, including 75,000 square feet for classrooms, laboratories, offices, and meeting rooms. The north and south wings will house, respectively, the departments of Viticulture and Enology and Food Science and Technology. A third building houses offices and conference space for Robert Mondavi Institute staff.

The facility will also include kitchen laboratories and individual sensory testing stations for teaching and research. In this state-of-the-art facility, faculty will offer students a wider education and more courses in food/beverage sensory science than any other university in the world. In addition to being used for student teaching, the sensory theater will be used for outreach and educational activities ranging from popular courses for consumers to specialized courses for the industry.

Once fundraising goals are achieved, two additional facilities will be constructed within the RMI complex: a Teaching and Research Winery, and the Anheuser-Busch Brewing and Food Science Laboratory which will feature a teaching and research brewery and a food-processing pilot plant. Visitors to the Robert Mondavi Institute will be welcomed by 12 acres of vineyards planted at the new south gateway to campus. These vineyards will be used primarily for research but will also contain a demonstration area for consumer education.

RMA Group was contracted by UC Davis to perform observation and testing during mass grading for the building pad.  Due to the presence of weak soil, the grading consisted of sub-excavating the pad to a depth of 15 feet and replacing it with engineered fill.  Usubgrade was present at the base of the excavation; we stabilized this subgrade by placing geogrid material. We also performed observation and testing of the backfill for the storm and sewer lines.